Daily Current Affairs News: January 6, 2021

India needs low-input, high-output agriculture

The ongoing debate on agricultural reforms seems to have overlooked one important aspects of agriculture — the role of agricultural R&D in supporting the farming systems.

  • Farmers in Punjab, Haryana and western UP are in the forefront of the current agitation against farm bills.
  • Imagine the scenario of these farmers having alternative crops crops that could replace rice and wheat or both and were as remunerative as the two cereal crops.
  • They would not have opposed the agricltral bills.
  • The current debate focuses too much on minimum support price. The debate also
    pays attention to farmers’ debt and post-harvest losses, cash transfers etc.
  • Howver, nobday has bothered to talk about reducing the natural resource inputs — most critical being water —and agricultural R&D.
  • India needs low-input, high-output agriculture.
  • Low input in terms of both natural resources and monetary inputs.
  • India needs low-input, high-output agriculture; low input in terms of both natural resources and monetary inputs. This cannot be achieved without science and technology.

Click to read the original article on which this note is based.

India Covid-19 vaccine roll out

  • Science’s triumph over Covid-19 is not complete yet.
  • Already, there are signs of the emergence of at least two highly contagious strains.
  • Expediting vaccination without adequate knowledge of their impact on indigenous recipients warrants caution.
  • This is not the first time that medications have been pushed through in India.
  • Influenza vaccines had received the green signal during the H1N1 outbreak sans efficacy data.
  • India is yet to learn to demand accountability from manufacturers and regulatory institutions even in the arena of public health.

Click to read the original article on which this note is based.

Access to justice in a post-Covid world

  • Any move towards the online functioning of courts must account for the digital divide in India.
  • While mobile phones are used widely, access to the internet and advanced digital equipment remains limited to some urban users.
  • Lawyers in semi-urban and rural districts found online hearings challenging because of internet connectivity issues.
  • Along with connectivity, the choice of digital platforms also affected experiences of online hearings.
  • The shutdown of courts across India provided an opportunity to adapt to digital modes of working.

Click to read the original article on which this note is based.

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